Blacklisted Ingredients

All # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Parabens

A family of preservatives used in food, pharmaceuticals, and beauty products. They include Benzylparaben, Butylparaben, Isobutylparaben, Isopropylparaben, Methylparaben, and Propylparaben. There is some evidence that parabens can accumulate in human breast tissue. Clinical studies on animals have indicated that parabens may mimic estrogen and act as a potential hormone (endocrine) system disruptor.  


Sources:


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jat.958


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/jat.860


http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/parabens/


http://ec.europa.eu/health/scientific_committees/consumer_safety/docs/sccs_o_041.pdf



PEGs (Polyethylene Glycol)

A  group of ingredients with the prefix “PEG-” followed by a number. They are made by the process of ethoxylation in which carcinogenic ethylene oxide is reacted with other ingredients to make them less harsh on the skin. As a result of the ethoxylation process, 1,4-dioxane is created and can be left behind in the product. 1,4-dioxane can be reduced or removed from a product through the vacuum-stripping process. But independent tests show that many manufacturers fail to do so. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) has classified 1,4-dioxane as “likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” FDA studies showed that 1,4-dioxane can penetrate human skin. 


Sources: 


https://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ProductsIngredients/PotentialContaminants/ucm101566.htm


http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/14-dioxane/


https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/phs/phs.asp?id=953&tid=199


https://www.organicconsumers.org/press/ocas-new-study-finds-greatly-reduced-carcinogens-personal-care-products

Phenoxyethanol (Additional Names: 2-phenoxyethanol)

A common preservative used in cosmetics, skincare, and personal care products. It is a member of the glycol ether family and is the product of the reaction of highly corrosive phenol with carcinogenic ethylene oxide. As a result, it may contain residue amounts of both. The American Society of Contact Dermatitis lists phenoxyethanol as one of its core allergens, even in concentrations as low as 1%.


Sources:


https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/substances/toxsubstance.asp?toxid=133


https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/mmg/mmg.asp?id=144&tid=27


https://www.contactderm.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=3563


https://online.personalcarecouncil.org/ctfa-static/online/lists/cir-pdfs/pr139.pdf


Phthalates

 A large group of chemicals, including dibutyl phthalate (DBP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), and butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP). DBP, DEHP, and BBP are banned in the European Union from use in cosmetics due to their potential to disrupt the endocrine system and cause birth defects. DEP is commonly used as a fixative in synthetic fragrances. We do not use any synthetic fragrance in our products. The research on DEP is less conclusive but there is some evidence that it may interfere with the normal function of the endocrine system and cause birth defects in animals. 



Sources:


https://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ProductsIngredients/Ingredients/ucm128250.htm


http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/phthalates/


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1241863/pdf/ehp0112-000331.pdf


https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/substances/toxsubstance.asp?toxid=112


https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/phs/phs.asp?id=601&tid=112



Propylene Glycol

A type of alcohol commonly used in skin care and cosmetics. It is a controversial ingredient associated with skin irritation. Numerous patch tests on humans have shown that it has a very low risk of causing a skin reaction even at concentrations as high as 20%. Since some people may still be sensitive to it, we decided not to use it in our products.



Sources:  


https://online.personalcarecouncil.org/ctfa-static/online/lists/cir-pdfs/PR560.PDF


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.0105-1873.2005.00693.x


Propylparaben

Propylparaben is in the parabens family of preservatives used in food, pharmaceuticals, and beauty products. There is some evidence that parabens can accumulate in human breast tissue. Clinical studies on animals have indicated that parabens may mimic estrogen and act as a potential hormone (endocrine) system disruptor.  





Sources:


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jat.958


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/jat.860


http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/parabens/


http://ec.europa.eu/health/scientific_committees/consumer_safety/docs/sccs_o_041.pdf


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14636695


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